Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

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Père Castor
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par Père Castor » ven. 4 sept. 2020 12:42

general26 a écrit :Je suis en chantier peinture de mes deux bataillons d'infanterie légère du Würtemberg (figurines Minifig 25 mm).

Comment le second régiment se distinguait-il du premier si toutefois différenciation il y avait ?
———
Oups ! J'ai dévié sur les jägers ! :oops:

Texte extrait du livret de Rawkins que je te recommande d'acheter (5£) :
HEADGEAR
In 1805 both battalions of light infantry were uniformed in a style which followed that prescribed for the line infantry in the 1799 regulations. The headgear was the black leather helmet with brass front plate embossed with the Württemberg coat of arms surmounted by a Ducal crown, and a trailing horsehair crest. The peak was black leather with brass trim and the black leather chin-strap was fastened with a large round brass boss. The short plume worn at the tip of the combe was light blue over black for the Leichtes Infanterie Bataillon ‘von Neubronn’ and light blue for the Leichtes Infanterie Bataillon ‘von Scheler’.
In 1807 the helmets were replaced with a black felt shako with leather trim to the upper edge and a black leather tightener strap at the base. The peak was black leather with brass edging and the black leather chin-strap had a plain round brass boss. The upper edge of the shako was decorated with a yellow and red wool cockade. Both battalions wore a tall feather plume, scarlet for the 1st battalion and dark green for the 2nd Battalion and white cords and flounders for full parade dress. The shako was decorated with a dark green turban, held at the rear of the hat with a concealed button and fastened with strings at the front. This shako continued to be worn by both battalions until late 1811 when the regulations for that year ordered it to be replaced with the Austrian style infantry shako, however, both battalions would appear to have continued to wear the older pattern hat possibly into the 1812 campaign in Russia. The new shakos were definitely issued to the reformed battalions in 1813 and were black felt with black leather trim at the upper edge and black leather peak and rear visor trimmed with brass edging. The black leather chinstrap was fastened with a black enamel and brass boss. Both battalions had brass lozenge shaped shako plates embossed with the Royal FR cipher, surmounted by a Royal crown and the shakos of the 1st Battalion were decorated with yellow V stiffeners at the sides and a yellow tightener strap. Both battalions had a small red, black and yellow cockade at the left side of the shako and white cords and flounders were worn for parade dress.
The only known pattern of fatigue cap is the French style bonnet de police worn from 1808 which was light blue with dark green piping and tassel.

COAT
The coat issued in 1805 was of the 1799 infantry pattern as worn by the line infantry but was an olive green with collar, cuffs, lapels, shoulder- straps and turnbacks light blue, piped white. Cuffs were of the squared pattern for the Leichtes Infanterie Bataillon ‘von Wolff’ (formerly ‘von Neubronn’) with two buttons, one on the cuff actual and one above at the trailing edge. Leichtes Infanterie Bataillon ‘von Brüssele’ (formerly ‘von Scheler’) had pointed cuffs with two buttons at the trailing edge one on the cuff actual and one above. All buttons for the 1st Battalion were brass and all buttons for the 2nd Battalion were white metal.
In 1808 the cuffs for both battalions were changed to a pointed pattern with a single button at the front and no piping on the trailing edge. In 1811 the battalions were ordered into new coats of the same pattern but with olive green lapels. The only distinguishing feature between the two battalions was now the colour of the buttons.

NOTE:
Various different sources show different shades of green for the coat varying from a lightish emerald green by Ebner to a dark sea green by Stadlinger; Leinhart and Humbert give a lightish grass green in their plates. The only known surviving material from the light infantry coats before 1815 is very discoloured and shows some evidence of having been formerly a blue infantry coat dyed green, possibly in 1805 when the battalions were created using elements of other battalions.
It is believed that the intended colour for the coat be the same as that worn by the jägers and therefore I have used the colour definition ‘Olive Green’ from the British Standards Palette BS341 as the closest colour match to the uniform colour when newly issued.
(Notes on colour details courtesy of Peter Gebhardt of Karlsruhe)

BREECHES, ETC
Breeches were white and worn with black knee length gaiters with brass buttons. From 1811 overall trousers of olive green were issued for winter wear and for campaign and these do seem to have been worn by at least some of the light infantry during the 1812 campaign in Russia, and until 1815.
In 1813 the reformed battalions were initially issued with white breeches, but these were replaced with olive green breeches in late 1813 or early 1814.
The greatcoat being worn by the light infantry battalions in 1805 was of the pattern issued to the army in 1786 and was dark grey with a high falling collar and deep ‘Swedish’ folded back cuffs. The coat was single breasted and closed at the front with a single row of ten brass buttons. There was a shoulder-strap on the left shoulder only of the coat colour.
This was replaced in 1811 by the new pattern greatcoat as worn by the line infantry. The coat was pepper-grey and mid-calf length and closed at the breast with a single row of eight large white metal or brass buttons, according to the battalion button colour. The cuffs were of the deep ‘Swedish’ style and the high upright collar was light blue. There were now two shoulder straps which were light blue piped white as for the uniform tunic. When not worn the coat was usually folded and stored on the regimental baggage wagons but by 1810 coats were usually rolled and strapped over the left shoulder as a protection against sabre cuts, or folded and strapped above the back pack.

EQUIPMENT
The Leichte-Infanterie-Bataillone were issued with belting which was basically the same pattern as for the line infantry except that it was of buff leather with brass buckles and fittings. The waistbelt was worn between 1805 and 1807 when it was replaced with a second shoulderbelt to support the sabre. The sabre-briquet was of the 1799 Württemberg pattern with brass single bar swept hilt and a brown leather scabbard with brass fittings. The sabre-straps for all companies were white until late 1814 when the coloured company knot system was finally introduced.

The pouchbelt was buff leather, worn over the left shoulder and supported a cartridge pouch of the same pattern as used by the line infantry, black leather with a brass oval badge on the lid embossed with the Ducal arms prior to 1813 when new plates with the Royal FR cipher were issued.
There would appear to have been several changes in the type of weapons issued to the light infantry during the period. Initially both battalions would appear to have been predominately armed with the Prussian m 1790 Fusilier Model infantry musket, however at least some fusiliers of the 1st Battalion appear to have received issues of the m 1798 Austrian rifled carbine. There were large numbers of these excellent light infantry weapons distributed to the armies of the Confederation of the Rhine after the defeat of the Austrians in 1805. By 1812, King Frederick had made the decision to re-arm his army with the French m 1777 musket and whilst it is unclear if the Voltigeur Model muskets had been issued to the light infantry by the commencement of the 1812 campaign the reformed battalions in 1813 were definitely issued with the French muskets which remained in service until well after the end of the Napoleonic era. Copies of the muskets manufactured by the Württemberg arms factory at Oberndorf am Neckar are distinguished by the brass fittings.
The Prussian and Austrian muskets were equipped with bayonets but in the 18th Century tradition were carried ‘fixed’ on the musket, usually fitted point downwards for marching order. Unofficially the practice in the field was to cut a slit in the sabre frog so that the bayonet could be pushed through and carried on the belt. On the march it was common practice for the sabre and bayonet to be secured in place with the sabre-strap.
With the introduction of the French muskets the bayonet could no longer be carried in the reversed position on the muzzle of the gun and the French bayonets were issued with a brown leather sheath with brass fittings and a whitened leather frog to be fitted to the sabrebelt behind the sabre frog. All Württemberg light infantry muskets had buff leather slings.

The packs were of the same patterns as issued to the line infantry regiments but with all straps buff leather with brass buckles. The light infantry were instructed to lodge their packs with the battalion baggage train when skirmishing in combat until the 1812 campaign.

OFFICERS & NCOs
The non-commission officers were distinguished in the same manner as those of the line infantry. The 1805 pattern helmet was as for the other ranks. From 1807 the shako was decorated with a metallic lace band around the top, a single wide band of flat lace for the Oberfeldwebel and a double narrow band for the unterfeldwebel. The lace and the cords and flounders were gold or silver according to the battalion button colour. The edge of the turban was also trimmed with gold or silver lace. The Korporal wore the same headgear as the fusiliers until 1813 when the new shako was introduced and then was distinguished by a narrow white band around the top, regardless of button colour.
The unterfeldwebel wore the same pattern coat as the men except that the collar, cuffs and lapel were trimmed with a 2 cm width of battalion colour flat metallic lace, with gold or silver according to the button colour. Prior to 1811 the lace on the collar decorated the lower and leading edges and after 1811 the upper and leading edges. The same year, with the introduction of the olive green lapels the lace was removed from the lapels and appeared on the collar and cuffs only. The unterfeldwebel was equipped and armed as for the men except that the sabre-strap was silver or white with silver knot and tassel.
The Oberfeldwebel prior to 1811 wore the infantry officer style coat with longer tails but with the distinctive gold or silver lace on the collar, cuffs and lapels and the coat was without shoulder-straps. After 1811 the officer pattern coat was replaced with a short tailed coat as worn by the unterfeldwebel but again without shoulder straps and lace on the collar and cuffs only. Prior to 1811 the oberfeldwebel was armed with a straight bladed 1790 warrant officer’s pattern, degen or epee, similar in appearance to the officers sword but with a heavier blade and a solid brass grip and D hilt. The sabre-straps were silver. After 1811 these swords were officially withdrawn and replaced with the 1799 pattern sabre-briquet but many oberfeldwebels appear to have been still carrying the older weapon at least into the 1812 campaign in Russia. The oberfeldwebel was not issued with a pouchbelt and was not armed with a musket.
Both the oberfeldwebel and unterfeldwebel carried the tradition cane of office throughout the era, although these were officially withdrawn in 1811. The canes were hazel for the unterfeldwebel and often black lacquered for the oberfeldwebel with a gilt or silvered cap and heel. The cane-strap was as for the sabre-strap.
Initially the officers of all ranks wore the bicorn hat of black felt with a plain black bow cockade held with a gold or silver cockade-strap and silvered or gilt button. The bicorn hat remained the headwear for field officers until 1815 but from 1807 the company officers were issued with shakos of a similar pattern to those of the fusiliers. The upper edge of the shako was trimmed with a wide band of flat metallic lace, gold or silver according to the button colour. The front of the shako was decorated with a gilt oval plate embossed with the Württemberg arms and surmounted by the Royal Crown. For parade the cords and flounders were gold or silver according to the battalion lace colour. This was replaced in 1812 with the Austrian pattern shako with silver lace trim to the upper edge and silver cords and flounders for all officers of both battalions. The front of the shako was decorated with a crowned lozenge shaped gilded plate embossed with the Royal FR cipher.
The officers’ uniformrock followed the long tailed pattern worn by the officers of the line infantry but were olive green with light blue facings and white piping as for the battalion and all buttons either silver plated or gilded. In 1807 epaulettes of rank were introduced as for the line infantry officers and these were either gold or silver according to the battalion button colour. In 1814 the epaulettes became silver for all officers. The silver, red and black officers’ sash was worn by all officers when on duty.
Officers’ breeches were white and worn with plain infantry pattern boots. Field officers were mounted and wore high cuffed riding boots of the heavy cavalry style. From 1811 olive green breeches began to make an appearance for campaign dress and olive green overall trousers with a narrow gold or silver stripe on the outer seam were often worn for campaign.
Greatcoats were initially of the 1786 pattern dark grey, double breasted, and calf length with deep Swedish cuffs and a fall collar. The collar and the lining of the coat were of the regimental facing colour and buttons were white or brass according to the battalion colour. These coats were replaced in 1807 with a more modern coat as worn by the line infantry officers in olive green with a high upright collar of light blue piped white and brass or white metal buttons. From 1811 the epaulettes of rank were worn on the greatcoat most of which were now dark grey.
Officers belts were basically as for the line infantry except that all belting was black leather with brass buckles and fittings and the officers of the light infantry were armed with the curved sabre instead of the degen. There were no officially prescribed patterns of sabre and most officers purchased their weapons privately although most appear to have favoured with the Württemberg light cavalry sabre with plain steel branch hilt or sabres of similar pattern to those carried by French light infantry officers. The sabre- straps were silver for all officers.
Senior officers were mounted and the shabraque was olive green with squared front and rear corners. The saddle cloth was trimmed with a wide edging of silver or gold flat lace, according to the battalion button colour and was piped olive green at the extreme edge.
The pistol holsters had double flapped covers which were olive green and edged with silver lace piped olive green as for the shabraque.
From 1814 all lace trim was silver for both battalions and in late 1814 or early 1815 the crowned royal cipher motif was embroidered in the rear corners in silver.

MUSICIANS
The light infantry battalions officially employed hornists instead of drummers, however in practice, as in other armies the Württembergers found that the horns were not very practical in the field. A moving hornist tended to produce poor quality signals and the sound could often not be heard over the roar of the battlefield. Orders were more clearly given using the officer’s and feldwebel’s whistles. In common with other armies by 1812 the light infantry were issuing their company musicians with both the horn and a drum.
The musicians uniforms followed the same style as the fusiliers except that the plume was in three sections, red/dark green/red for the 1st Battalion and dark green/red/dark green for the 2nd Battalion. The coats were as for the other ranks with the addition of swallows nest epaulettes at the shoulders of light blue trimmed white for the 1st Battalion and olive green edged yellow for the 2nd Battalion and W of lace
decorating the field. From 1814 both battalions had swallows-nest epaulettes of olive green edged white. All other details of the uniform were as for the men.
The sabre-briquet continued to be carried on a buff leather waist-belt throughout the era.
The horns were of two distinct patterns. In 1805 the light infantry were issued with the ‘groβe-jagdhorn’ a large brass hunting horn which quickly
proved too cumbersome for use in the field and easily dented or damaged. By 1809 these had been relegated to parade use and were replaced for everyday use with a much smaller and more practical instrument. In 1812 the larger horn was withdrawn completely. Cords were yellow or green with red/yellow/black knots and tassels. Those companies with drummer/hornists after 1812 had drum carriages of buff leather with a brass drumstick plate and the drummers’ apron was buff leather.

Voilà, j'ai corrigé l'erreur dont je m'étais enduit ! ;)
Écris-moi si tu veux les images, Jean-Luc. :)
« La perte d'espoir, plutôt que la perte de vies humaines, est le facteur qui décide vraiment des guerres, des batailles et même des combats les plus minimes. »
Basil Henry Liddell Hart, 1895-1970

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Raph
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par Raph » ven. 4 sept. 2020 13:01

Woooow .. génial :)

Voila ce que j'ai noté sur les spécificités des deux bataillons :

HEADGEAR
Both battalions wore a tall feather plume, scarlet for the 1st battalion and dark green for the 2nd Battalion
COAT
All buttons for the 1st Battalion were brass and all buttons for the 2nd Battalion were white metal

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Père Castor
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par Père Castor » ven. 4 sept. 2020 13:23

Je t'ai mis un petit cadeau sur mon site, tu tires l'image sur ton bureau puis tu la lâches ! ;)
L'image a été scannée sur le livret du « Cercle histoire et figurines » (à l'envers pour me faciliter la tâche), elle est mieux renseignée que celle que l'on trouvait sur le site Histofig : boutons jaunes au 1er (cuivre) et blancs au 2e (fer-blanc).
« La perte d'espoir, plutôt que la perte de vies humaines, est le facteur qui décide vraiment des guerres, des batailles et même des combats les plus minimes. »
Basil Henry Liddell Hart, 1895-1970

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Raph
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par Raph » ven. 4 sept. 2020 15:10

Super !!!

bon je ne sais pas pour les autres mais moi j'ai trouvé ma référence en "uniformologie napoléonienne de l’extrême" :)

general26
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par general26 » mar. 8 sept. 2020 17:28

Bonsoir à tous.
Mille fois merci à toi Thierry. Je n'avais pas osé t'interpeller sur ton site que j'ai parcouru en mainte occasions. Permets moi de t'en féliciter. Il me reste plus qu'à faire appel à mon traducteur officiel le cheikh Spear.
Amitié.
Jean-Luc

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fabrice le grognard
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par fabrice le grognard » mar. 8 sept. 2020 18:56

Merci Père castor pour le lien des Rawkins :D
Au fait, je ne sais pas si tu as eu le problème ?, j'ai voulu acheté les livres au format numériques sur le site et à chaque fois je me suis fais rembourser ? Je me suis rendu par après sur le lien Ebay pour une commande de 4 livres et çà a fonctionné . Je vais les recevoir en DVD rom avec couvertures :D
Ma passion pour les figurines plastiques ou métal 20 mm Empire
http://waterloo-miniatures.overblog.com

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Père Castor
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par Père Castor » mar. 8 sept. 2020 22:09

Salut Fabrice :)
J'ai acheté tous les livres au format numérique en deux fois, janvier et juillet 2018, en passant par Paypal et je n'ai pas rencontré ce problème à l'époque ? :|

Bonne peinture à tous. ;)
« La perte d'espoir, plutôt que la perte de vies humaines, est le facteur qui décide vraiment des guerres, des batailles et même des combats les plus minimes. »
Basil Henry Liddell Hart, 1895-1970

lionelrus
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Re: Infanterie légère du Würtemberg

Message par lionelrus » dim. 13 sept. 2020 20:49

general26 a écrit :
mer. 2 sept. 2020 12:08
Merci Nico pour ta réponse.
Malheureusement mes recherches sur le site de Père Castor n'ont pas été fructueuses. Je les distingue donc à la couleur du pompom (bleu azur pour l'un et noir pour l'autre), les deux couleurs étant indifféremment représentées sur les planches existantes.
Bravo pour m'avoir démasqué...
Serais-tu le général danois de la JG d'Evry?
On en apprend des choses sur le nico, grand fou, va....

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